The first thing to get used to in writing effective radio, is that there are no rules, and no restrictions on the places the listener can be transported to, and nowhere that is out of bounds. The only barriers are the restrictions in the writer’s imagination. Radio has always been able to create the fantastic worlds, unbelievable situations, and outlandish characters, the visual medium with newly developing computer graphics, has only recently been able to achieve. The Theatre of the Mind. A well used and often overused phrase within the radio industry is that ‘Radio is the Theatre of the Mind.’ This phrase is an attempt to demonstrate the power of the medium in that radio uses chiefly the listener’s imagination to create the pictures, characters and backdrop for the all the writer’s intent. There are those who insist therefore that the ‘pictures’ on radio are better and more effective…

Are there basic ground rules to follow in an interview, or is just a free for all where anything goes? Media Relations at Concordia University in Montreal, produced a helpful and useful guide to what they called “Interview Rights and Responsibilities.” It provides a framework for any interview where the rights of both parties in any interview are balanced by concurrent responsibilities. Before agreeing to an interview they suggest, both parties should, in that well known expression, ‘Know Your Rights.’ This applies to both the interviewer and the interviewee as people and persons to be respected. If both parties agree to or are aware of these rights, however informally, a better and more balanced interview will result.